Sudbury Militia
History of the Sudbury Companies of Militia & Minute
Sudbury Militia
Sudbury Militia
Sudbury Militia
Sudbury Militia
Sudbury Militia
Sudbury Militia
Sudbury Militia
Sudbury Militia

The present-day Sudbury Companies of Militia & Minute model themselves after the Sudbury militias of 1774 and 1775 - particularly with the South Militia commanded by Lieutenant Colonel Ezekial How Sr, Innkeeper of How's Tavern (The Wayside Inn).

On April 19th, 1775, a messenger reached Sudbury between 3 and 4am bringing news that British Regulars had left Boston the evening before and were headed westward, presumably to Concord where military supplies were garrisoned. Each Sudbury contingent heeded the call and took the most expedient route to what is now called Battle Road.

Since the routes were different, each company had a different level of participation that day, but it seems the North and South Companies both headed for Concord's South Bridge. Before reaching South Bridge, the Sudbury Companies learned it was held already by British Regulars and they were ordered to turn northerly and for the North Bridge, where other towns were assembling. At this time, Sudbury also learned that Colonel Barrett's house was ransacked by redcoats.

"If any blood has been shed not one of the rascals shall escape!" Ezekial How Sr. On Punkatasset Hill, about a mile north of the Concord meeting-house, the Provincials were being constantly reinforced by the militia of Westford, Littleton, Acton, Sudbury, and other neighboring towns. Soon they would number around 450 bodies, far outmatching the British Regulars sent to hold North Bridge. When smoke was seen rising from Concord center, the Provincials marched on the bridge and drove the regulars away.

However, it is surmised that Sudbury did not engage British Regulars until a short distance beyond Meriam's Corner, Concord. In this area, the fighting was heavy as the British Regulars retreated through a narrow gap and were vastly outnumbered. At this location, Sudbury was to lose its first resident to battle, Deacon Josiah Haynes. Later, in Lexington, the town would lose young Isahel Reed.

In the weeks to follow, townspeople from Sudbury would fight at The Battle of Bunker (Breed's) Hill and then join the formal Continental Army as part of the 4th Regiment to fight in The Northern Campaign.

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